Shredding + Rebonding Textiles

This is what I’m curious about lately — shredding and rebonding textiles. It started when I was cleaning my living room rug. I noticed the pad under the rug was made up of bits and pieces of salvaged foam. I’ve always liked the look of this material. It’s classic — like a quilted moving blanket or a cast iron pan. carpet padding

One of the problems we face with the fashion industry is the amount of waste. What if we mined that waste and used it as a resource. We could grind up fashion that is no longer wanted and turn it into a new classic textile. Something that is so unique and performs so well that it could not be ignored.

Let’s back up and see how carpet padding is actually made? This type of padding is called rebonded polyurethane. This video shows how scraps of foam are ground into smaller bits. The bits are then bound together with chemicals and steam into something like a giant loaf of bread which can then be cut into usable slices.

Could we do something similar in a more organic way but with textile scraps instead of foam? Textile shredders already exist. What if each of our town dumps had a textile shredder that could grind up textile waste and resell it?

The shredded textile on its own could be useful as filling but let’s take it one step further. Could these textile scraps be rebound into a new iconic fabric? It seems like a solvable problem. In the end, we could end up with a gorgeous terrazzo-like fabric.
blue terrazzoInstead of seeing bits of marble or glass we could see bits of jeans or flannel. The material could become a new classic like a herringbone or gingham.
colorful terrazoTo achieve this terrazzo look we’d need to make the fabric the way felt is made. If you think it sounds complicated just think about how silk is made.

What do you think? It’s crazy, right? I think it’s time. It’s time for a Fashion Revolution.

Advertisements

Slow Fashion

I was contacted via email by a researcher at the University of Helsinki about this short film on the Slow Fashion movement in Finland. The film is the result of academic research. It can be viewed in its entirely for free on Vimeo. Help spread the good word. #slowfashion

This research-based film explores how clothing designers and seamstresses in the Kallio neighborhood of Helsinki understand and practice sustainable fashion. It discusses contradictions of the concept of sustainability and emphasizes that sustainability should include responsibility towards nature and also towards people, including the designers and seamstresses themselves, who experience precarity because of tension between sustainability and profitability of their micro-enterprises.

Emma Watson’s Met Gala Dress will inspire you.

Here is another reason to love Emma Watson. You should follow her on Instagram.

For the last few decades, if someone asked you, “Did you make your dress?” — it was not exactly a compliment. If your dress looked “homemade” then it was construed as not chic. It feels like the pendulum is swinging and we are in a time when wearing your sustainability on your sleeve is respected and admired.

This Friday, I feel lucky to be able to attend  TEDx PiscataquaRiver at 3S Artspace. I am most excited to see Maxine Bédat, the co-founder and CEO of Zady. Zady is a clothing and consumer goods e-commerce company that emphasizes ethical consumerism. Thinking about all this prompted me to scroll through the Zady Instagram page. I was struck by this quote below.

tailors

Wouldn’t it be great if Portsmouth became the capital of sustainable style? Let’s start by supporting our local tailors.

THAT WOULD BE GREAT