1920s Style for 2018

In the midst of summer, I always start daydreaming about my fall wardrobe. I feel more comfortable in layers. 1920s style is creeping into my brain. Not the Halloween Gatsby version, but a more authentic version. I’ve read a little about why women’s fashions changed so drastically.

According to Gale Virtual Reference Library:
The changes in women’s clothes came from new attitudes about life and work. During this decade women won the right to vote and many earned their own money. Women needed stylish clothes that they could wear to work or out during the day. For everyday wear women wore a tailored suit. For more festive occasions women wore clothes that were more comfortable and luxurious than before the war. The tight corsets that squeezed women into unnatural shapes were replaced with loose-fitting outfits and, eventually, by figure-skimming gowns with revealing necklines and open backs.

Below is some of the inspiration I pinned to my 20s Pinterest board. Follow the link to my board for more inspiration and links to sources.

Maybe it’s a reaction to the modest dressing movement but I appreciate how the curves of the body are not accentuated.


What follows is how I want the 1920s style to influence my fall/winter wardrobe. Let’s start at the top.

I just recently got bangs. It was my way of dipping my toe in the water on my way to getting a Louise Brooks haircut.

The Louise Brooks pageboy haircut can easily translate into a simple modern look.

Next up — the cloche. I like the idea of a cloche hat but in reality, everything feels too costumey. I do love the vintage French straw cloche hats below. I like how they would keep the sun out of your eyes and also allow you some privacy. If you find a modern MINIMAL winter cloche hat, please let me know.

In terms of tops, I’ll search for hip length sweaters and boyfriend cardigans over plain white shirts buttoned all the way up. Can you see it? Can you see the minimalist modern version in your mind?


I have one pleated skirt that I got at the swap years ago. I love it but it is summer weight. You can literally see through it. I’d love to find some comfortable knit pleated skirts. Not surprisingly, I’ve posted about sweater skirts in the past. Click here to see the full post.

When thrifting online or in person I’ll keep my eyes out for knee length or tea length pleated knit skirts like this one in the Bemydear boutique on Etsy.

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I’ll continue to wear ribbed tights and brogues. I like the look of these cotton Falke tights. I’d also love to invest in a pair of brogues with a little heel like these ones on the Colenimo Instagram feed.

Colenimo is a small British boutique brand that I stumbled upon while researching. I love their modern take on vintage style.

Lastly, the cocoon coat. The cocoon coat is like the cloche. It can get costumey real fast. What I want is just that feeling of being enveloped in comfort and warmth with big lapels that I can pop up as a nod to 1920s.

All of the coats below are waaay out of my price range but they each have elements that I will be looking for — oversized, nipped in at the knee, and big lapels that I could pop up for style and warmth.

I already own a JCrew collarless cocoon coat that I bought secondhand. I’m thinking maybe I can add a vintage sheepskin collar to it. Is that too weird?

What do you think? Am I going too far? What are you looking forward to wearing for fall/winter? Let me know in the comments. xo jam

I’ve just realized that New Year’s Eve for 2020 is around the corner and everyone is going to have a 1920s theme. 🙂

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Anna Hepler

I wish I’d seen this Anna Hepler show at the Portland Museum of Art back in 2010.

Love her work, her style, her process. So inspiring.
Especially love the Double Hung wire sculpture from this 2017 exhibition. Cheeky.

anna hepler
Installation view, Hardwired, Staniar Gallery, Washington & Lee University.

It makes me think of Ruth Asawa’s work. There is a new book out soon about Ruth Asawa. We have it on order at the Portsmouth Public Library. You can place a hold on it here.

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Image via RuthAsawa.com

I was reminded of Anna Hepler’s work via a post on Remodelista about The Soot House on Spruce Head Island in Maine. Follow the links to a post about the 1754 Cape to see Hepler’s work in the wild.

Soot House via Remodelista

Image from Remodelista.

Click over to Remodelista and follow all the links. It will inspire you to turn off all your screens and do some work.

 

9th Annual Clothing Swap

2018-Clothing-Swap

9th Annual Clothing Swap
Saturday, May 12 | 10 AM to 2 PM
Connie Bean Center
155 Parrott Avenue (Next to the Library)

Goodwill Industries of Northern New England and the Portsmouth Public Library are proud to host the 9th Annual Clothing Swap on Saturday, May 12, from 10 AM to 2 PM.

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Bring Men’s and Women’s Clothing. Don’t forget footwear and accessories. All seasons welcome. Bring winter coats and summer dresses.

This year, the SWAP will be held across the parking lot in the gym at the Connie Bean Center!

Participants are asked to bring a bag of gently used, clean clothing, shoes, and accessories, and leave with a bag of “new-to-you” items. In the spirit of giving, participants are asked to give more than they get. Remaining clothing and accessories will be donated to Goodwill.

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This is a clothing drive. Please give more than you take.

 

 

The swap is a fun, social event helping people see fashion as an opportunity to give back to society. Donating unwanted clothing saves it from landfills, and a donation becomes an exciting addition to another’s wardrobe.

SWAPPERS
Bring a friend and a cloth bag to the swap.

The swap benefits Goodwill Industries of Northern New England, whose retail stores help to keep usable goods out of the landfill. Last year, more than 300 people participated in the swap, donating over 1,800 pounds of clothing. The sales of all un-swapped donations help fund Goodwill programs in the Seacoast area and throughout New Hampshire.

Goodwill Industries of Northern New England enables individuals with diverse challenges to achieve personal stability and community engagement. A social enterprise for over 100 years, Goodwill reflects the integration of economic, social and environmental sustainability, with a focus on connecting people to marketplace employment. Services are funded by revenue from retail and recycling operations, grants, fees, and philanthropic investments and gifts.