Two-Tone Jeans

One side of me feels like the two-tone jean trend is something we will all regret very soon and the other part of me is dying to cut up two pairs of jeans and sew them together.

I recently went to the Future Forecast slow fashion runway show in Boston put on by Blue Prints for Sewing. (Thank you to Maya Critchfield for bringing this event to my attention! BTW Maya is currently at the Students for Zero Waste Conference in Philly teaching mending techniques! Go Maya! Go Maya!)

Anywhoo, prior to the Future Forecast runway show there was time to shop from and meet local designers. I was wandering around the room, taking it all in, and then I saw Season 15 Project Runway contestant — Nathalia Castrillon! She is a sustainable and ethical fashion superstar and you should def follow her. She had a pair of two-tone jeans for sale. I instantly fell in love with them! They weren’t my size but she said she could make a pair for me. I’ve been thinking about it ever since.

Nataliajmag

Nathalia Castrillon 

I might attempt to make a pair for myself on Black Friday but if I epically fail then maybe I’ll reach out to Nathalia to get a custom pair. I could wear them during Project Upcycle!!

In the meantime, I’m collecting inspiration. I’m not loving the store-bought versions as much as the DIY looking ones and I seem to prefer the ones that are actually sewn together rather than just bleached to look two-tone.

cow nottingham
Cow Nottingham
grey champagne on Insta
Grey Champagne
House of Tame on Insta
House of Tame

I particularly like this technique that B SIDES jeans is using where they add a new side panel seam. This could allow me to make some vintage jeans that I love actually fit!

B side side Jeans
B Sides Jeans

What do you think? Is it too trendy or is a way to have fun with sustainable style!

 

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CALL TO DESIGNERS – PROJECT UPCYCLE 2019

call to designers bg

Get ready to stretch those creative muscles, fashion designers!

3S Artspace, Recovergirl & Goodwill of Northern New England are once again joining forces to promote regional designers and sustainable fashion in the 2nd Project Upcycle design competition.

If you are ready to meet other inspiring designers and put your design skills to the test, please apply to compete in this wildly creative and fast-paced design challenge, transforming secondhand clothing into a gala-worthy outfit!

TO APPLY, VISIT 3SARTS.ORG

Eight designers will be chosen for Project Upcycle which takes place March 28-30 and culminates in the highly anticipated Project Upcycle Runway Event on March 30, 2019.

ABOUT PROJECT UPCYCLE:
Project Upcycle brings emerging designers together to foster connections, encourage creativity, and inspire growth. We are helping to plant the seeds for sustainable fashion brands in New England and beyond, and developing an audience that will support you on your design path.

PRIZING:
A cash prize will be awarded to the top three designers. Prizes come with no strings attached. Winners can use the funds as they wish!
First Prize: $1,500
Second Prize: $1,000
Third Prize: $500

1920s Style for 2018

In the midst of summer, I always start daydreaming about my fall wardrobe. I feel more comfortable in layers. 1920s style is creeping into my brain. Not the Halloween Gatsby version, but a more authentic version. I’ve read a little about why women’s fashions changed so drastically.

According to Gale Virtual Reference Library:
The changes in women’s clothes came from new attitudes about life and work. During this decade women won the right to vote and many earned their own money. Women needed stylish clothes that they could wear to work or out during the day. For everyday wear women wore a tailored suit. For more festive occasions women wore clothes that were more comfortable and luxurious than before the war. The tight corsets that squeezed women into unnatural shapes were replaced with loose-fitting outfits and, eventually, by figure-skimming gowns with revealing necklines and open backs.

Below is some of the inspiration I pinned to my 20s Pinterest board. Follow the link to my board for more inspiration and links to sources.

Maybe it’s a reaction to the modest dressing movement but I appreciate how the curves of the body are not accentuated.


What follows is how I want the 1920s style to influence my fall/winter wardrobe. Let’s start at the top.

I just recently got bangs. It was my way of dipping my toe in the water on my way to getting a Louise Brooks haircut.

The Louise Brooks pageboy haircut can easily translate into a simple modern look.

Next up — the cloche. I like the idea of a cloche hat but in reality, everything feels too costumey. I do love the vintage French straw cloche hats below. I like how they would keep the sun out of your eyes and also allow you some privacy. If you find a modern MINIMAL winter cloche hat, please let me know.

In terms of tops, I’ll search for hip length sweaters and boyfriend cardigans over plain white shirts buttoned all the way up. Can you see it? Can you see the minimalist modern version in your mind?


I have one pleated skirt that I got at the swap years ago. I love it but it is summer weight. You can literally see through it. I’d love to find some comfortable knit pleated skirts. Not surprisingly, I’ve posted about sweater skirts in the past. Click here to see the full post.

When thrifting online or in person I’ll keep my eyes out for knee length or tea length pleated knit skirts like this one in the Bemydear boutique on Etsy.

bemydear

I’ll continue to wear ribbed tights and brogues. I like the look of these cotton Falke tights. I’d also love to invest in a pair of brogues with a little heel like these ones on the Colenimo Instagram feed.

Colenimo is a small British boutique brand that I stumbled upon while researching. I love their modern take on vintage style.

Lastly, the cocoon coat. The cocoon coat is like the cloche. It can get costumey real fast. What I want is just that feeling of being enveloped in comfort and warmth with big lapels that I can pop up as a nod to 1920s.

All of the coats below are waaay out of my price range but they each have elements that I will be looking for — oversized, nipped in at the knee, and big lapels that I could pop up for style and warmth.

I already own a JCrew collarless cocoon coat that I bought secondhand. I’m thinking maybe I can add a vintage sheepskin collar to it. Is that too weird?

What do you think? Am I going too far? What are you looking forward to wearing for fall/winter? Let me know in the comments. xo jam

I’ve just realized that New Year’s Eve for 2020 is around the corner and everyone is going to have a 1920s theme. 🙂