Shredding + Rebonding Textiles

This is what I’m curious about lately — shredding and rebonding textiles. It started when I was cleaning my living room rug. I noticed the pad under the rug was made up of bits and pieces of salvaged foam. I’ve always liked the look of this material. It’s classic — like a quilted moving blanket or a cast iron pan. carpet padding

One of the problems we face with the fashion industry is the amount of waste. What if we mined that waste and used it as a resource. We could grind up fashion that is no longer wanted and turn it into a new classic textile. Something that is so unique and performs so well that it could not be ignored.

Let’s back up and see how carpet padding is actually made? This type of padding is called rebonded polyurethane. This video shows how scraps of foam are ground into smaller bits. The bits are then bound together with chemicals and steam into something like a giant loaf of bread which can then be cut into usable slices.

Could we do something similar in a more organic way but with textile scraps instead of foam? Textile shredders already exist. What if each of our town dumps had a textile shredder that could grind up textile waste and resell it?

The shredded textile on its own could be useful as filling but let’s take it one step further. Could these textile scraps be rebound into a new iconic fabric? It seems like a solvable problem. In the end, we could end up with a gorgeous terrazzo-like fabric.
blue terrazzoInstead of seeing bits of marble or glass we could see bits of jeans or flannel. The material could become a new classic like a herringbone or gingham.
colorful terrazoTo achieve this terrazzo look we’d need to make the fabric the way felt is made. If you think it sounds complicated just think about how silk is made.

What do you think? It’s crazy, right? I think it’s time. It’s time for a Fashion Revolution.

Victor & Rolf Fall/Winter 2016/2017

If ever there was a runway show to inspire upcycling — this is it.

Mark my words — that basketweave effect on the jeans will be a street style trend.

Apparently, Victor & Rolf created this “Dickensian vagabond vibe” by upcycling their previous collections. I don’t know about you, but I am inspired to create a rag rug dress. It would be the perfect thing to wear to an art opening. Minus the chimney sweeper hat.

Read the full runway review over on Vogue.com.

Normcore

My friend and I were talking about how we are just not into fashion that much lately. For me, it has to do with not wanting to buy anything unless it is secondhand, or well-made by an independent designer (expensive). Also, as a library clerk, I can’t afford that much.

The world feels depressing lately so I decided to dive back into fashion blogs and see if I could get excited about anything. I stumbled upon Double3xposure, a fashion blogger, on Instagram. She is a 20-year-old college student living in Atlanta, Georgia. What I love about her style is how normal she looks.

Her hair is undone. She is wearing sensible shoes. Many of her outfits are just a t-shirt and cut off jeans. I particularly love that she embraces the off-the-shoulder trend by wearing a pajama top that she simply shimmies around her shoulders. #genius

Seeing her outfits got me thinking of normcore (think hardcore normal). I’d always heard about it but didn’t really know what it meant. I found this Vogue video where Alexa Chung interviews the people (K-Hole) who invented the term. This story is fascinating! You have to watch this. It’s like an art joke altering the fashion industry.

Wanting to always promote sustainable style is like always being on a diet. Occasionally, I just want junk food. Double3xposure has inspired me to keep eating healthy. I’m inspired to be creative with what I already have and make smart investments with pieces that I love.

Double3xposure says about her personal style:

To me having style has nothing to do with the amount of money you have. I believe style has to do with the creativity you put into the outfits you wear with the things you already have.

BTW — It is through Double3xpsoure that I learned about Older Brother. I love how eco-friendly and unisex their designs are.

P.S. Vivienne Westwood wrote a great blog post called — Unisex is good for the environment.

That’s enough to chew on for now. xo jam