Project Upcycle 2018 Designers

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We are very pleased to announce the finalists for the 2018 Project Upcycle Sustainable Fashion Competition and Runway Event. These designers will be challenged to upcycle secondhand clothing provided by Goodwill into gala-worthy outfits. The live runway event takes place on Saturday, March 24, 2018. Cash prizes, provided by Saltwater Creative of Portsmouth, NH, will be awarded to the top three designers (First: $1,500, Second: $1,000, Third: $500). For event updates and to learn about the “role” models and VIP judges visit (and RSVP) to the Facebook Event Page. To learn more about the designers follow the links below.

2018-Designer-Finalists

Adara Bankhead is a high school senior from Portland Maine who loves vintage style clothing, making jewelry, sewing, and multimedia art.

Jackiellen Bonney is a textile and fashion designer with a focus on the human experience and how clothing can open new opportunities for healing, self-empowerment, and growth.

Jared DeSimio is an artist and designer who is always on the hunt for old worn-out clothes. A love of Hip-Hop and rural lifestyles are what influence his work the most.

Justin Desper is a Textile and Fashion Design graduate from Maine College of Art. While there, his focus centered on creating garments through a process that stimulates a desire to explore form, function, and problem-solving. With an appreciation for the bodies, his pieces adorn, Justin considers his models as collaborators in his work and holds his collaborative relationships in the highest regard.

Kirsten Elfe is a student of textiles and fashion at Maine College of Art and a Portsmouth native.

Maya Critchfield is an antique textile and tool seeker who specializes in fiber art, mending, and printmaking.

Tamsin Whitehead is an artist, designer and University Lecturer, teaching classes in feminism, sustainability and the fashion industry. Her academic work focuses on gender expression and representation, which she also explores in her wearable designs. She employs a variety of different media but is particularly interested in textiles and the transformation of materials through recycling.

Chloe Larochelle is a recent graduate of the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. She is passionate about sustainability and hopes to play a role in this movement that is spreading to every corner of the industry.


Mark your calendar and BUY YOUR TICKETS
before they are all gone!!!

SATURDAY, MARCH 24
6:00pm – 7:00pm Cocktail Hour & Gallery Pop-up
7:00pm – 9:00pm Runway Competition
9:00pm – 10:00pm After Party and Celebration
$35 for Members / $40 for Non-Members

Follow me (Recovergirl360), 3S Artspace, and Goodwill of Northern New England on Instagram for special announcements and behind the scenes Instagram stories.

xo jam

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States of Undress

Why have I never heard of this series before today? It looks amazing! I will start binge watching it this weekend. It looks like you can watch all the episodes of Season 1 on the VICELAND website. Season 2 just started airing on June 6th.

You can follow Hailey Gates on Instagram.

Shredding + Rebonding Textiles

This is what I’m curious about lately — shredding and rebonding textiles. It started when I was cleaning my living room rug. I noticed the pad under the rug was made up of bits and pieces of salvaged foam. I’ve always liked the look of this material. It’s classic — like a quilted moving blanket or a cast iron pan. carpet padding

One of the problems we face with the fashion industry is the amount of waste. What if we mined that waste and used it as a resource. We could grind up fashion that is no longer wanted and turn it into a new classic textile. Something that is so unique and performs so well that it could not be ignored.

Let’s back up and see how carpet padding is actually made? This type of padding is called rebonded polyurethane. This video shows how scraps of foam are ground into smaller bits. The bits are then bound together with chemicals and steam into something like a giant loaf of bread which can then be cut into usable slices.

Could we do something similar in a more organic way but with textile scraps instead of foam? Textile shredders already exist. What if each of our town dumps had a textile shredder that could grind up textile waste and resell it?

The shredded textile on its own could be useful as filling but let’s take it one step further. Could these textile scraps be rebound into a new iconic fabric? It seems like a solvable problem. In the end, we could end up with a gorgeous terrazzo-like fabric.
blue terrazzoInstead of seeing bits of marble or glass we could see bits of jeans or flannel. The material could become a new classic like a herringbone or gingham.
colorful terrazoTo achieve this terrazzo look we’d need to make the fabric the way felt is made. If you think it sounds complicated just think about how silk is made.

What do you think? It’s crazy, right? I think it’s time. It’s time for a Fashion Revolution.